Sumit Sharma

Making shopping easier for us…

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As we continue to use the internet for purchasing all types of goods, the amount of data being generated in relation to our browsing for goods and services is a huge shift for retailers in getting to know the customer. The first step has been accomplished: Obtaining the data. The next step is to be able to make sense of this data to their advantage.

Right now, Amazon.com has all this data on what I have navigated in the past 5 years, regardless of whether I followed through with a purchase or not. How useful is this? Basically, Amazon.com only knows I browsed the page for Winnie the Pooh five years ago and that’s it – why I did that – Amazon has no clue whatsoever. Here is the point: Amazon.com may make sense of that search I made 5yrs ago based on plain numbers in which case they’d label me as a Winnie the Pooh fan, or perhaps a Disney fan. Now fast forward to today, I haven’t searched anything close to Winnie the Pooh merchandise in the last 4 years on Amazon.com in which case they might strike me off as a Winnie the Pooh fan – that makes sense if I was only existing in the virtual world. How do they know I haven’t been frequenting the Disney.com website every month for Winnie the pooh stuff? They don’t, and perhaps never will until and unless there is an interface from Disney.com to Amazon.com.

Also, Amazon.com hasn’t got a clue about my physical activities and perhaps I have been visiting Toys R Us for certain specific Winnie the Pooh merchandise every single week because I’m actually a Winnie the Pooh die hard junkie. Perhaps, I only buy Winnie the Pooh merchandise when I’ve visited my baby nephew – how does Amazon know that – they’d know that if they’d read my Facebook wall. Hopefully you’ve realized how in this example, the data Amazon.com had about me was useless.

Had all aspects of my Winnie the Pooh related activity, across both the physical and virtual realms, been able to have been recorded and made available to Amazon.com, that would’ve made a world of a difference to Amazon – it would have told them about how useless their Winnie the Pooh site is, and it would have broken all conceptions about what my customer preferences are in their eyes.

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Written by Sumit

December 10, 2009 at 6:44 am

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